Analyse This

Some of you may well have seen the story doing the rounds on the Internet recently concerning the rock band Iron Maiden and how they supposedly used data to help plan their world tours. While the story wasn’t all that it was cracked up to be, it does show how bands can now use all that data flying around in cyberspace to their own advantage.

The company mentioned in the original article is called Music Metric (http://musicmetric.com/). What they do, for a fee, is collect the many billions of musical interactions across the Internet. The sources of that information include social media, illegal file sharing sites, music streaming services, etc.

Music Metric then analyse all of that data providing a band, record company, or even a fan of a particular artist with a snapshot of how an act is performing online, right across the world.

You can then delve deeper into that collected data to see where your music is being streamed the most, where your music is being illegally downloaded the most, and also where you’re being talked about the most, even down to the age, gender and location of your fans.

The original article suggested that Iron Maiden had used this information to select countries where it might be best for them to tour next time around, especially those countries where their music maybe wasn’t being bought, but illegally downloaded.

The thought being that maybe they could then get those people to a gig and sell them merchandise, etc. That way the band would be making money from gig tickets and merchandise, even if they couldn’t persuade the fans to buy their music. And who knows, they might even convert them to doing that, as well?

Iron Maiden have never admitted to doing this, and why let the possible truth get in the way of a good story eh? However, as mentioned before, it does help to highlight how any band can now utilise all of that online data for their own purposes and maybe ultimately profit from it too.

We all know that sales of CD’s and music generally isn’t what it was. Most bands nowadays struggle to earn a decent living from making music in this digital age. You’ve no doubt read about how bands only make real money these days from playing live and selling t-shirts. So at least there is now a way that artists can be that little bit smarter when it comes to targeting fans in the future.

Even if you don’t, or can’t afford to use a service like Music Metric, any artist can use the data from their fans social media activities, digital and CD sales, and streaming services for their own ends.

Most social media sites, YouTube and dedicated band sites, etc have some form of analytics service built into their pages, especially if you run those pages yourself.
Yes, it takes a bit of time, which is after all why a service such as Music Metric exists in the first place. But, maybe now is the time to dig a little deeper yourself and use that, often, free info for your own benefit?

If it’s good enough for Iron Maiden (allegedly), surely it’s got to be good enough for you too? Regardless of the popularity of your band.

Ultimately, can you afford not to give it a try? It might just be the thing that gives your band the edge over all the others out there.

 

Local Music Online

After months of procrastination I finally took the plunge recently and signed up to Spotify Unlimited. So far it’s been a very worthwhile decision as the amount of music available to listen to is vast, maybe too vast at times?

As I’m sure many others have done themselves, I’ve taken this ‘Unlimited’ opportunity to explore and listen to albums and artists that I’d not heard before, for many reasons. I’ve also checked out some of those critically acclaimed and award winning albums and artists too.

This has led me to some great new music and has even had me dipping into my wallet to buy albums by artists that I would probably never have listened to without this opportunity.

But, the other thing I’ve noticed is just how often I’ve been disappointed by what I’ve heard. Many of those critically acclaimed artists and award winning albums have left me cold.

I realise you can’t like everything, but I must admit to being surprised at the lack of quality of some of what I’ve heard. That old story about the Emperors New Clothes has come to mind on at least one occasion.

Yesterday was a case in point. I spent the morning listening to some of those aforementioned albums and artists and came away unfulfilled. It was then that I saw a link on Facebook to a new album by a local act, which I duly followed. Immediately the difference in quality was apparent.

This brought home to me, once again, just how well much of the original music output of the Hastings area stands up to the worldwide competition and on many occasions actually surpasses it.

As I’ve tried telling many people over the years, just because music is local doesn’t mean it’s not any good. Often the reverse is true. After all, all music is local to somewhere.

So, if you listen to music via the Internet and want something new to whet you musical taste buds, why not have a go at listening to something from the local area?

Many of our local bands and musicians can be heard via sites such as Spotify, Soundcloud and Bandcamp. Why not search for them the next time you’re there, or just follow the links on their Facebook page or website? It is often the only way you can actually get to hear the recorded works of local artists too.

So far this week I’ve listened to such diverse local artists as Hornet, Dollboy and Vile Electrodes online.

Why not give it a go yourself? You don’t know what you’re missing.

Blog Post – Selling Your Music Online.

Phil Little has written another very informative and interesting blog post for Pierless Music, this time all about selling your music online.

It’s one of those topics that has raised its head for most original bands and musicians over the past few years. But, as with anything like this, it can be a bit of a minefield out there with many different companies offering you their services. So, which is the best one to go with?

Hopefully, Phil will give you at least some of the answers in his post.

Find it here: http://pierlessmusic.co.uk/blog-posts/phil-little/selling-your-music-online/